Why publish two additional versions of an article?

As technology advances, people are able to access information across a wide variety of platforms, including television, newspapers, and websites. But as access to information grows, so does the proliferation of inaccurate or untruthful information. For the average person, it can be difficult to decipher what is true and what is not, especially when it comes to subjects they may not be well-versed in, such as science.

With the Fair Journal, we hope to combat inaccurate scientific information being shared with the general public by giving them a more digestible version of scientific research so they are better informed and better able to discern between truthful and inaccurate information. 

To accomplish this goal, the Fair Journal publishes scientific information in two additional formats: an easy-to-understand summary for adults, and a cartoon version for kids. In the adult version, scientific studies are shared in easily accessible language so people without a science background can understand the research and its ramifications. The children’s version focuses on making science fun while explaining the essence of the research at hand.

By making a version for kids, our hope is that they will grow up being smarter, more critically thinking, have better ideas to solve the problems of the future, and be more innovative than previous generations. 

FAQ

Are the different versions published at the same time?

No, unfortunately not. As our cartoons are currently produced by a freelance cartoon studio, we cannot afford to send every submission for cartoon production immediately. Therefore, we the scientists to either wait until the layman summary has earned 100$ (1/3 of current average production costs for a cartoon), or pay 300$ to the Fair Journal at submission. And just for the record: We do not earn any money from this, as all the money will go to the freelance animation studio.

Who makes the different versions?
  • The layman summary is made in collaboration between the scientists and editors from the Fair Journal. 
  • The cartoon version is made by scientists from the Fair Journal in collaboration with an animation studio. Authors of the original paper are allowed to comment on the video script before it is send off for production.